2021 Oceania DX (OCDX) Contest

The phone section of the 76th 2021 OCDX starts at 06:00 Z on Saturday, October 2nd, and ends at 06:00 Z on Sunday, October 3rd.

OCDX promotes HF contacts to and from stations in the Oceania region  as well as contacts between stations inside Oceania. DX transmitting entrants contact as many Oceania stations as possible.

Prefixes are multipliers, entries on individual bands are supported. Contest exchanges are signal reports plus a serial number, starting at 001. The deadline for submitting logs is 31 October 2021.

Current rules can be downloaded from here.

My First CQ WPX SSB Contest

by Solomon, 9V1BC

9V1BC
Photo of me during the contest. Taken by Amos Hoe 9V1HH.

Contest is by no means exclusive to the elite HAMs with large tower, yagis, fanciful equipment and years of experience. They do have an advantage, but we rookies have a seat at the contesting table too. On March 27th and 28th 2021, I participated in my first SSB contest. It was the CQ WPX SSB contest. It was a very fun experience, and I was extremely excited that I could have phone conversations with HAMs in places as far as Europe and North America. In this particular blog, I share my setup, experience, and the lessons I learned from this contest. I hope it might inspire you to get an amateur radio license and join us in the next contest to foster international friendship. If you already have a license, well then, what are you waiting for?

My setup for the Contest

HAMs always like to ask each other what equipment they use, and I see this question coming my way. This is my equipment list for the contest.

Power SupplyAlinco DM-330FX
RadioIcom 718
AntennaIcom AH4 + Random Wire
Homemade Inverted V Dipole
LoggerLaptop running XLog

Contest Experience

9V1BC-car
Equipment in the trunk of my car. My radio is on the left. The antennas are on the right. The miscellaneous equipment is in the box in the middle.

I packed up my stuff into the trunk of my car. It fit nicely into a small compact compartment. I brought a few tools – like a screwdriver and a small knife – and spare items just in-case I had to make quick field repairs. This setup is almost impossible to carry by hand or public transport. After all, the Icom 718 was made to be a base station, not a mobile one. I set up my station on a nice hill in my school. It was one of the areas I identified as potentially suitable for radio operation given its decent radio horizon, and relatively less noise compared to my home.

Night time view from the hill where I operated from. Taken by Amos Hoe 9V1HH.

I set up my random wire antenna right beside the down slope. I did not want anything to block my signal. The white box is the AH-4 antenna tuner. It gives me the ability to switch bands at will. An antenna typically needs more time to be tuned and adjusted when the operator wishes to change bands. In this setup, a wire of random length is attached to the AH-4 tuner, and suspended off the ground by a fishing pole about 16′ high (5m). A ground wire is attached to the other end of the tuner and thrown down the hill. Antenna theory is very complex, especially with impedance, resonance and radiation pattern, I may have given you the false impression that I had taken them all into consideration in my setup. This was a bare minimum setup. I made no such fanciful consideration. My priority was simply to get on the air.

My random wire antenna setup, tuned by the Icom AH-4.

Unfortunately, barely half an hour after I set up, a huge storm streamed by and took away four hours of valuable contest time. What a wet blanket! The wind was so strong it bent my fishing pole a good 45°. But I wasn’t too concerned about the pole breaking. I had a spare. I almost always bring a spare antenna. I resumed the contest immediately after the rain stopped.

My point of view (literally) during most of the contest. I eventually got back pain as the radio was placed too low to the ground. I moved it later to the top of the shelf.

For almost the entirety of the contest, I either called CQ CONTEST on an empty frequency, or I tuned around on the dial to find others calling CQ CONTEST. I had my hand on the mic and the other hand on the electronic logger, XLog, on my laptop. During the first two hours of the contest, I only got contacts from Indonesia. Then I got contacts from Japan, and Australia. In the evening, I was very surprised to hear European and North American stations!

Time (UTC)Locations Heard
0230 to 0320Indonesia
0720 to 0920Indonesia, Philippines,
Hong Kong, China, Japan
0920 to 1030Indonesia, Japan, Australia, China
1130 to 1300Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, China
1300 to 1800Indonesia, Philippines, Australia,
United States, Ukraine, Slovenia, Serbia,
Italy (but Italy could not hear me), Poland

A contest SSB QSO goes like this:

Me: “CQ CONTEST CQ CONTEST 9 VICTOR 1 BRAVO CHARLIE CONTEST”
Him: “NOVEMBER DELTA 7 KILO ”
Me: “NOVEMBER DELTA 7 KILO, YOURE 59, 068. QSL?”
Him: “QSL QSL. YOURE 59, 1509. GOOD LUCK FOR THE CONTEST. 73”
Me: “THANK YOU. YOU TOO. 73. THIS IS 9V1BC. CONTEST. QRZ?”

The key exchange in this contest is the signal report and the serial number. The serial number is particularly important as it is used to verify QSOs.  In this case, ND7K’s report to me is that my signal is 59 (meaning readability of 5 out of 5, and signal strength of 9 out of 9) and that I am his 1509th contact for the contest. My report to ND7K is that his signal is 59 (meaning readability of 5 out of 5, and signal strength of 9 out of 9), and that he is my 68th contact.

Sometimes I call CQ for a good 15 minutes or so before a station even responds to me. I would tune around the band then to see if the band had died. I wouldn’t want to waste energy calling when no one can hear me. But that’s how it is even more exciting when a station finally responds! My eyes light up and I get all excited!

Sometimes, the QSO does not go as well. Here’s one example. He couldn’t hear my callsign. Maybe I was being stepped on by other stations which could not hear me. Needless to say I gave up. I’d be wasting his time and my own trying to force the QSO through the QSB.

Me: “9 VICTOR 1 BRAVO CHARLIE”
Me: “9 VICTOR 1 BRAVO CHARLIE”
Him: “IS THAT A KILO BRAVO?”
Me:“9 VICTOR 1 BRAVO CHARLIE”
Him:“9 VICTOR 1. OK OK. QSB. QSB.”
Me:“9 VICTOR 1 BRAVO CHARLIE”
Him: “I’M HEARING A 1 KILO BRAVO CHARLIE. AGAIN?”
Me: “9 VICTOR 1 BRAVO CHARLIE”
Him: “KILO 1 BRAVO CHARLIE?”
Me: “NUMBER 9. VICTOR. NUMBER 1. BRAVO CHARLIE”
Him: “OK. VICTOR ECHO 1 BRAVO CHARLIE. YOU’RE 59”
Me: “NEGATIVE NEGATIVE. NUMBER 9. VICTOR. NUMBER 1. BRAVO CHARLIE”
Him: “VICTOR ECHO 1 KILO BRAVO CHARLIE. Roger?”

It’s normal to copy the wrong callsign and serial number. Everyone has a different accent. A few stations will do the exchange in their native language. I heard a few Indonesian stations do that with other Indonesian stations. A Chinese station gave me my report in Chinese. But not everyone understands each other’s native language or heavily accented English. Thus, it is normal to hear people use other forms of phonetics to complement the NATO ones. Some examples are listed in the table below.

LetterNATO PhoneticHAM Lingo
QQuebecQueen
UUniformUnited
OOscarOntario
GGolfGermany
JJuliettJapan
VVictorVictoria
KKiloKilowatt (not to be confused with kW)
FFoxtrotFrance

For example, the callsign KJ7VOU could be phonetically spelled as “KILOWATT JAPAN 7 VICTORIA ONTARIO UNITED” instead of its NATO form, “KILO JULIETT 7 VICTOR OSCAR UNIFORM”.

Sometimes when the signal is poor, HAMs will read back what they copy to verify. This is normal because some contests penalize for wrongly copied information. Those who watch military films like Generation Kill, police documentaries like COPS, or listen to online Air Traffic Controllers would be familiar with confirmation phrases like “read back correct”, “affirmative” or “10-4”. HAMs have a similar lingo. It is called “QSL”. It means I acknowledge receipt of what you told me.

“NOVEMBER DELTA 7 KILO, YOURE 59, 068. QSL?”

“QSL QSL. ROGER THE 59, 068. YOURE 59, 1509. GOOD LUCK FOR THE CONTEST. 73”

However, like the NATO phonetics, many HAMs have their own unique way of confirming that the read back is correct. These are usually replies to the question, “IS THAT A QSL?”, which asks you to confirm whether I have copied you correctly.

PhraseExample
“Roger Roger”Him: “9V1BC, YOU ARE 59, 1509”
Me: “059 3509. IS THAT A QSL?”
Him: “NEGATIVE. NEGATIVE. 1509. 1509”
Me: ”ROGER. 1509. IS THAT A QSL?”
Him: “ROGER ROGER”Me: “THANK YOU. 73 ”
“QSL QSL”Him: “9V1BC, YOURE 59, 1509”
Me: “59, 1509. IS THAT A QSL?”
Him: “QSL. QSL”
Me: “THANK YOU. 73 ”
“Over Over”Me: “CQ CONTEST. 9V1BC. CONTEST”
Him: “7C8C”
Me: “7C8C?”
Him: “OVER OVER”
Me: “7C8C, 59, 060 ”

This contest got so addictive I decided to pass on lunch and dinner. I had some contest rations on me, so I consumed those as my “meal” instead. I would have continued the contest through the night, but my mom called me at 2am and chased me home. So too bad for me. This is a map of the QSOs I made by the time the contest ended. I logged a total of 88 contacts (pun unintended). To be brutally honest, 88 is nowhere impressive. Many other stations rack up thousands of QSOs. My 88 is not much numerically, but it is a huge morale booster for me. For many months, I complained about the terrible noise level and poor propagation on HF. It was hard to even establish a FT8 QSO, let alone a SSB one. This contest proved me wrong, and I’m happy that it did. It is possible to have SSB contact with just about anyone anywhere with a humble setup and 100W.

Map of my 88 contacts.

Acknowledgement

I would like to convey my thanks to all the HAMs who shared their invaluable experience, advice, knowledge and even gear with me to get me started in HF, especially Daniel 9V1ZV, James 9V1YC, Peter 9V1PK, Roland 9V1RT, Ben 9V1KB, Darryl 9V1DE, Emmanuel F5LIT, and Jie Feng 9V1BD, who introduced me to HAM radio back in 2018 in the first place!

It makes no sense to do HAM alone. Part of the fun comes from making, laughing at and learning from silly mistakes I make along the way. You make my HAM experience fun and meaningful, and for that, I thank you.

73 Solomon, 9V1BC

CQ WPX Contest SSB 2021

The CQ WPX Contest is one of the big international contests during the year. In 2021 the SSB part took place on the weekend March 27 – 28. This year we had a record in participation of Singapore hams.

Call SignCategoryBandPowerOverlay
9V1BCSingle OPAllLowRookie
9V1BDSingle OP20 mLowRookie
9V1CDSingle OP40 mHigh
9V1DESingle OPAllLow
9V1KBSingle OPAllLowClassic
9V1KGSingle OPAllLowClassic
9V1HYSingle OP20 mLow
9V1PLSingle OPAllLow
9V1YCSingle OPAllHigh
9V1ZVSingle OPAllLow
Singapore participation CQ WPX SSB `2021

Raw scores will be published in about 2 weeks. Thanks to all for your active participation!

The CW part will take place on May 29/30, 2021.

2019 CQ WW DX Contest SSB

From Saturday, October 26, 00:00 UTC (08:00 SGT) to Sunday, October 27, 23:59 UTC (Mon, 08:00 SGT) the 2019 CQ World-Wide DX Contest took place. It is one of the biggest international contests during the year.

The objective for amateurs around the world is to contact as many CQ zones and countries as possible. Contest exchange is RS report plus CQ Zone number (28 for Singapore).

Following SARTS members participated in the contest:

CallEntryOPsQTHQSOsCQ-ZDXCCRaw
9V1YCM-19V1YC
9V1BH
9V1HY
9V1YC146168174750,445
9V1CDSOL40Arnold9V1CD1338,505
9V1KGSOLAKlaus4E1A85271120436,817

M-1: Multi OP High power, Single transmitter, SOL40: Single OP Low power 40m, SOLA: Single OP Low power, all bands.

Raw scores will be published on the CQWW web site.
Thanks to all OPs for the activity!

2019 Oceania DX Contest

Coming weekend the Oceania DX Contest CW will take place. Contest period on Oct 12th, 08:00 UTC to Oct 13th, 08:00 UTC on all HF bands except WARC bands.

The object is for Oceania transmitting stations to contact as many stations as possible inside and outside the Oceania region.

Non-Oceania transmitting stations to contact as many stations as possible inside the Oceania region.

Exchange: RST report plus a progressive contact serial number starting at 001 for each band. Multiplier is the number of different valid prefixes worked (may be counted once on each band.

Official website: https://oceaniadxcontest.com/index.html

Pulau Ubin Field Day Jul 2019

On July 27 and 28 a team of Singapore hams took the ferry to Pulau Ubin and used the IOTA contest as an opportunity to have a field day.

IARU HF Championship

From July 14 to 15 the IARU HF Championship will take place, starting Saturday 12.00 UTC (20.00 SGT) and ending Sunday 11.59 UTC (19.59 SGT).

Objective is to contact as many other amateurs, especially IARU member society HQ stations, around the world as possible using the 160, 80, 40, 20, 15 and 10 meter bands. You can find the detailed rules on the ARRL website.

Logs must be uploaded within 5 days after the event via the preferred online web service at contest-log-submission.arrl.org.